Backpacking Equipment Checklist

The first part of a backpacking adventure begins long before you leave the house. It starts with the idea of a backwoods excursion; it progresses with the accumulation of the right gear, and culminates with your first step into the wilderness. While it’s the final step that’s the most exciting, it’s the first two that set the tone for the trip. To have the best backpacking adventure possible, make sure you have the right equipment, from the checklist below or download the new and updated Backpacking Checklist PDF.

Backpacking Checklist

Food/Cooking
Extra day’s worth of food
Food and Condiments
Bear Bag or Container
Stove & Cook Gear
Stove and Windscreen
Fuel
Waterproof Matches
Cook Set and Pot Lifter
Cup/Mug
Eating Utensils
Shelter
Tent
Tarps/Ground Cloth
Bivy Sack
Back Packing Rope
Sleeping Gear
Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Pad
Pillow
Navigation
Compass
Maps
GPS
*Avoid Aids That Require Batteries
Personal
Toiletries & Lotions
Insect Repellent
Sun Screen
Hats for Rain, Sun and Cold
Sunglasses
Bandanas
Money
Lighting
Flashlight or Headlamp
Candles
Extra Batteries
First Aid
First Aid Kit
Personal Medication
Foot Care
Whistle
Repair Kits & Tools
Tent Repair Kit
Stove Repair Kit
Sleeping Pad
Multitool
Hiking Boots/Footwear
Men’s Hiking Boots
Women’s Hiking Boots
Hiking Socks
Gaiters
Extra Shoe Laces
Extra Pair of Camp Shoes
Men’s Clothing
Underwear
Rainwear
Fleece
Jackets
Shirts
Pants and Shorts
Women’s Clothing
Underwear
Rainwear
Fleece
Jackets
Shirts
Pants and Shorts
Backpack
Extra Nylon Straps
Rain Cover
Water Treatment/Storage
Water Filter or Chemical Treatment
Hydration Bladder or Water Bottle

 

Download the Backpacking Checklist PDF

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Campmor

  • The only thing missing is LoopRope which would fall under the shelter column.

  • Plfg

    First aid kit

  • Shoto2526

    Water treatment.

  • thebeezer

    headlamp or flashlight

  • Lazrohrs1

    Blister bandaids in your foot care, duct tape(has many medical uses!), lightweight gloves(I carry mine in all seasons), Mylar emergency blanket – never used in an emergency, but can be used as a drop cloth on the ground for card playing, dinner, etc, mosquito head covering, garbage bag with a drawstring, anti-chafing stick. Forget the pillow – buy a down sweater that comes in it’s own stuff sack and use that as a pillow, wet wipes, toilet paper, trowel!!!

  • Ol’ Dan’l

    If it is a trip where you will be wet a lot, I learned the hard way last year that you better have the right kind of antifungal creme along. Jock itch is bad in the wilderness. Put a tube in your first aid kit.

  • roryob50

    dont forget a 2 way radio

  • I don’t need to tell anybody who has spent more than three days on the
    Pacific Crest Trail that keeping your pack weight low is essential. The
    old boy scout motto of “be prepared” needs to be edited to: “be
    prepared to leave it all behind”. Leave books, leave stoves, leave
    cans, leave knives, machetes, harmonicas, binoculars, cameras, heavy
    clothes, bear repellent, bear bags, big tents, pots, heavy hiking boots and big flashlights. Leave
    anything that is going to take your dry pack weight over 20 pounds. Dry
    pack weight is the weight of your pack before water and food. In parts
    of the desert you have to carry a minimum of 6-7 quarts of water (12-13
    pounds) and five days of food (5-6 pounds), so even with careful
    planning, your total pack weight will sometimes be as much as 40 pounds.
    If 40 pounds doesn’t sound like much, ask yourself that question again
    after hiking 22 miles on a hot day.